forget, forgo, forsake, forgive

October 5, 2016 to October 15, 2016
Rosalind Lemoh

The new solo exhibition by Rosalind Lemoh, Forget, Forgo, Forsake, Forgive, will take place in Silo Bakery, Kingston. Lemoh will realize a temporary installation during the opening party on October the 5th, from 6pm to 8pm, while vitrines, shelves and walls of Silo Bakery will become a collection of icons and symbols created through different moments of her career, a temporary museum representing her personal world.

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The new solo exhibition by Rosalind Lemoh, Forget Forgo Forsake Forgive, will take place in Silo Bakery, Kingston. Lemoh will realize a temporary installation during the opening party on October the 5th, from 6pm to 8pm, while vitrines, shelves and walls of Silo Bakery will become a collection of icons and symbols created through different moments of her career, a temporary museum representing her personal world.

In 1651 the German jesuit Athanasius Kircher founded, in Rome, his Museum Kircherianum: in the rooms of the Roman College he displayed his collection of exotic artefacts, from China, India, some remains of the Ancient Egypt, different maps of various regions of the world, clocks, Magic Lanterns, alongside with Baroque paintings, sculptures and Natural history objects. Objects had a meaning not only for their own features, but as pieces of a bigger picture, of a greater knowledge that had no need for specialization. In 1651 the world was still a mysterious, unknown place: colonialism had just begun and the jesuit order was playing a major part in it. The Museum Kircherianum was meant to explain, visually, the vastity of this knowledge, its hidden meanings, the wisdom of far away cultures.

Collections are always, in fact, a key to something: to a personal obsession, to a particular idea of beauty, to the story of a nation or of a culture, and more often, to all the mentioned things together. When the collection is created by only one mind the meaning is always clearer, even if it includes every kind of object: in the case of Kirchner his museum appeared as a Great Baroque Theatre, where knowledge could not be separated from “meraviglia”, a sense of wonder and astonishment obtained mixing together science and beauty, realism and illusion. Rosalind Lemoh, as well, uses “meraviglia”; her art is sensuous, refined, desirable. We are attracted by objects that seem to hide secrets: mysterious emblems, black poisons, hands pointing to a universal truth. Her dark and uncanny imagery has a lot in common with Baroque, where still lifes were interweaved with symbols alluding to the transiency of life, the so-called memento mori; in the same way, when Lemoh casts vegetables and fruits in a sculptural still life, she stops the moment before their deterioration, she saves their shapes in a cold metal - she saves them but kills them, cause the metal takes away all the vitality leaving only an image, a simulacrum of the real object. We might perceive some echoes of distant rituals, African masks, bones and antlers coming from an undiscovered desert, mixed sometimes with words, alluding to a lyrical shared history (“shared history” is, in fact, what we read on one of them). Sometimes we might perceive some violence, sometimes we have Surrealist objects crossed by a light irony, pineapples combined with cabbage and artichokes. She mixes dead and alive, personal and universal, trying to make the temporary permanent, to make the common unique, through art: shape, lights, shadows, composition, beauty. In her temporary installation for Silo Bakery -only on view on the opening night - Lemoh will create a new contrast, introducing a perishable material: butter; its soft, fat, changing texture will be combined with the black coldness of coal.

Rosalind Lemoh (Sierra Leone, 1984) graduated from the Australian National University (ANU) School of Art in 2007 with first class honours majoring in Sculpture. She was one of the three top performing graduates to be included in Hatched: National Graduate Exhibition at Perth Institute of Contemporary Art. Since then, she has completed residencies at Canberra Contemporary Art Space and the ANU Sculpture workshop. In 2008, she received a travelling scholarship from the Spanish Embassy to research and produce an exhibition on interpretations of death in 16th century Spanish still life. She has been a national finalist in high profile exhibitions such as theWoolhara Small Sculpture Prize, The Churchie National Emerging Art Award and the Blake Prize and the Royal Bank of Scotland Emerging Art Award. She has held multiple solo and group exhibitions across Australia. In 2014 she was highly commended for her entry in the Harris and Hobbs Small Sculpture Prize and the Canberra Contemporary Art Space members show. In 2015, her work was short-listed for the national Paramor Prize: Art & Innovation at Casula Powerhouse in Sydney. In 2016, she was selected to exhibit at ArtRooms London 2016 which showcases international talent from around the world.

The Garage at is kindly offered by Silo Bakery.